Bhutanese Wild Cordyceps Drops

Bhutanese Wild Cordyceps Drops

More precious than gold!

Willd Cordyceps is one of the most precious herbs in the world. It is a quintessential tonic herb that grows at the snowline of the Himalayas and is collected each summer by indigenous collectors. This extremely rare mushroom, which grows on the body of a caterpillar, has been prized for centuries as an immune tonic that supports longevity and radiant health, physical strength, sexual power and stamina, mental strength and overall robustness. Wild Bhutanese Cordyceps is considered to be the best Cordyceps in the world.

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Product Description

Wild Cordyceps is one of the premier tonic herbs in the world. Along with Wild Ginseng, Wild Reishi Mushroom and Deer Antler Tips from the Spotted and Horse Deer, Wild Cordyceps is absolutely coveted by tens of millions of Asian people (and millions more around the world), but is generally only obtainable by those who can afford one of the rarest and most expensive tonic herbs in the world. Cordyceps has been used by humans for centuries as a tonic, revered for its ability to improve performance and vitality, resist aging, and as a protective herb of the highest order.

Traditional Function
Yin and Yang Jing tonic, adaptogenic Qi tonic, tonifies Lungs, Kidneys and Brain
Who can use it?
Everyone
Concentration
125:1
Specifications
Tincture - Dragon Drops
Other Ingredients
Water, grain alcohol (=30% by volume)
Dosage
Daily
  • Di Tao
  • Organic Ingredients
  • RT Seal of Approval
  • Sample Available
  • Top Seller
  • Wild Crafted
  • Vegan
  • Vegetarian
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Going Deep

History of Cordyceps

The medicinal properties of the fungus have been known to the Tibetans for about 1500 years. Shepherds noticed that their flock became particularly energetic after consuming the fungus and it is still used locally to increase the energy level of pack animals at high altitude, although the high price of the fungus now makes this economically unfeasible for the local people.

The fungus has been known to Chinese medicine since the Ming Dynasty, and to it is attributed a myriad of beneficial properties, some of which have been supported by researchers. Research is continuing at a strong pace.

Cordyceps sinensis is an invigorant in Chinese tradition and was honored as one of the three greatest invigorants together with Panax Ginseng and Deer Antler. It has a history of hundreds of years of use in the Tibetan and Chinese herbal systems. The Ben Cao Cong Xin (New Compilation of Materia Medica) by Wu Yiluo, written during the Qing Dynasty, lists the traditional usage of Cordyceps as going to the Lung and Kidney meridians and being useful as a “Lung protector”, for “Kidney improvement” and as a “Yin/Yang double invigorant”.

Hear Ron talk about Yin and Yang below:

Uses

Consistent use of Cordyceps helps to strengthen the skeletal structure, and specifically benefits the lower back region, the knees and ankles. It is traditionally used for minor and temporary backache due to injury, fatigue, stress or aging.

Cordyceps is also a major Lung tonic. It can be used to strengthen respiratory power in those who require extra energy in order to perform physical work (e.g., sports, exercise or labor) or it can be used by those who experience a deficiency of Lung power.

Cordyceps has always been used as a primary herb to fortify the defensive system of the body, and recent data indicate that Cordyceps is a potent immune system potentiator. Researchers in Japan and China have isolated a number of polysaccharides in Cordyceps which strengthen the immune system. Maintaining the immune system is one of the mechanisms that can slow down aging and help prevent both degenerative and acquired diseases.

Other studies have shown that Cordyceps can have a benefit in the vascular system as well. Cordyceps improves the function of the micro-circulation and improves efficiency at the capillary level. This is very important to our longevity. Cordyceps has been shown to support healthy blood pressure and to strengthen heart muscle.

Cordyceps is very highly regarded in China as a tonic for those who are recovering from an illness or an operation, or after giving birth. In these cases, the Cordyceps helps the patient recover their physical power, improve their appetite, and help protect the body from infection. When blended with other tonics such as Ginseng, Ganoderma (Reishi mushroom), Schizandra, Lycium (Goji) or Astragalus, Cordyceps’ power is even increased as the synergy of the various herbs results in an even more powerful tonic.

How We Source This Product

Wild Cordyceps is as close to a perfect tonic herb as there is.

It is supremely powerful, yet it is gentle enough that anyone can use it without any trace of a side effect. It is both Yin and Yang in nature and it is an ultimate Qi tonic and adaptogenic herb. It is energizing, perhaps even “stimulating,” but does not make you nervous or agitated. To the contrary, it helps preserve a sense of calmness and focus. It is a world class antiaging agent that protects immune functions and strengthens the mind. It goes through such a complex and delicate life cycle that it is impossible to duplicate precisely through cultivation.

Nevertheless, many scientists, research laboratories, universities and companies are cultivating Cordyceps in one form or another. The obvious problem with real wild Cordyceps, from the remote snowlines of the Himalayas, is that it is staggeringly expensive, putting it out of the reach of most people.

Handful Cordyceps

A handful of fresh wild Bhutanese Cordyceps. They're mushrooms, so they don't seem gross at all in real life.

Cultivation has progressed rapidly over the past two decades. Almost two decades ago, researchers in Asia learned how to produce Cordyceps mycelium using biotechnology. The Cordyceps is actually the mycelium and not the fruiting body, so it is somewhat different from Wild Cordyceps in that respect. Nevertheless, its chemistry is very similar to Wild Cordyceps and many studies over the last twenty years have shown that this biotechnology Cordyceps mycelium has profound health benefits. Dragon Herbs has been using this type of Cordyceps for the last ten years with great results.

In the last few years there are several new sources of superb cultivated Cordyceps. The new wave of cultivated Cordyceps does not contain the mycelium, but is completely stroma with intact fruiting bodies. Remember as I described above, the harvesters must wait for the spores to be released into the wind before collection can begin in the wild. This is to protect the species. But researchers believe that the spores themselves may possess potent actions that are extremely beneficial to our health. Reishi mushroom, for example, also produces spores which have turned out to be even stronger immune potentiators than the mushroom itself.

Some varieties of cultivated Cordyceps still have their spores in the fruiting body of the stroma. In Asia, this is considered VERY significant. The more spores, the more valuable. We have used cultivated Cordyceps with the biggest, richest spores available.

Rice-cultured Cordyceps

A bundle (about half a kilogram) of ultra-premium grade Rice-grown Cordyceps mushrooms with large spore heads (a sign of superior quality in cultured Cordyceps) which has been organically cultivated on whole rice instead of caterpillars. We used this as a base in our Private Reserve Bhutanese Wild Cordyceps.

We have chosen to use Cordyceps militaris grown on rice as a base for the wild Bhutanese Cordyceps used in our Private Reserve tincture. Cordyceps militaris is a species of Cordyceps that grows in China. Like Cordyceps sinensis, it is very widely distributed and used in Chinese herbalism as a superior tonic herb and is well studied. Rice is vegetarian, clean and nutritious. Studies indicate that rice Cordyceps contains an abundance of the main active constituents of wild Cordyceps, especially cordycepin, the main active constituent of Cordyceps. Of course, it probably does not contain some of the exotic trace constituents or the same precise DNA as wild Cordyceps. But it is a superb tonic in its own right, and I would be very happy to sell this product alone as a tonic herb (in fact, we do sell it as our “snack grade” eating-and-cooking Cordyceps). There are now many different grades of rice-grown Cordyceps available. Rest assured that I carefully selected the highest grade cultured Cordyceps for this unique product.

FAQ

What does Cordyceps do? Traditional and Modern Conventional Asian Functions
Primary Functions: Nourishes Jing (both Yin and Yang), strengthens the Kidneys and Lungs and tonifies Qi.
Secondary Functions: Bolsters Wei Qi (immunity) and relieves depression of Liver Qi.
Treasures: Yin Jing, Yang Jing and Qi
Atmospheric Energy: Warm
Taste: Sweet
Organ Associations: Kidneys and Lungs

Bhutanese Wild Cordyceps can go by several different names:
Botanical Name - Cordyceps sinensis
Full Latin - Cordyceps sinensis (Berk.) Sacc., belonging to the family Clavicipitacea
Chinese - Dong Chong Xia Cao (Winter Worm, Summer Grass)
Tibetan - Yarsha Gumba (Yartsa Gunbu)
Bhutanese - Yartsa Guenbub (or simply Bub)
Nepalese - Jeeban Buti
Japanese - Tockukaso
Korean - Tong Ch'ug Ha Ch'o
Common American English - Cordyceps, Caterpillar Fungus, Winterworm

Science

Point of Interest to Biology Nerds

It may be of interest to some of you (it is to me) that there is debate among scientists whether the various species in the Cordyceps genus are in fact single organisms or if they are actually symbiotic colonies of more than one organism. It is possible that Cordyceps sinensis may be a fungal/bacterial symbiosis. It appears that during certain stages of its life cycle, it may even temporarily incorporate some DNA from the caterpillar into its own genome! You may be familiar with Kombucha. Kombucha is generally thought of by the public as a fungus, but in fact it is not a fungus at all. It is an as-of-yet imperfectly identified symbiosis of various healthy yeast(s) and acetic acid bacteria. In nature, things are not always as they appear.

Life Cycle of Cordyceps Sinensis

In the case of Cordyceps, which is receiving considerable scientific attention due to its great commercial value and its many powerful health properties, DNA sequencing has so far proven inconclusive as to what exactly it is. This is because the DNA sequence tends to change with time. It appears that the fungus may be incorporating some of the insect DNA into its own DNA code for the initiation of its fruit body form, then loses the insect DNA when it goes back into its mycelial form. Is it collecting Jing from the caterpillar? This organism that we call Cordyceps really IS a “caterpillar fungus.” Life is so complex. More than 90% of the genes in the human body, scientists now know, aren’t even human – they belong to the hundreds of species of bacteria that live symbiotically in our body. These bacteria are mostly friendly, but they are not just living in us independently. Researchers now know that some (or many) of them actually control functions in our body, including how we handle nutrients like sugar and salt. Some even control our appetite.

Thus, it would not be at all surprising if Cordyceps turns out to be some kind of unique blend of organisms with primarily fungal traits.

Quality Control

Processing – Fingerprint Identical Transfer Technology™ (FITT™) Tincture Extraction

We used very fresh Cordyceps sinensis to produce this extraordinary product. Considering the expense and magnitude of this herb, it deserved our highest attention during the production phase. I believe that FITT™ is the ultimate extraction technology in the world today, especially for precious herbs like Bhutanese Wild Cordyceps.

Research indicates that Wild Cordyceps contains valuable components that are both water and alcohol extractable, so either a water extract or an alcohol extract alone would be insufficient to get everything out of the extraction. FITT™ not only extracts water and alcohol components, but extracts ALL components, as if you were consuming the herb raw, but with a very powerful digestive system.

Furthermore, Cordyceps is a sensitive herb. It can be harmed during harsh processing. In fact, some of the phytochemicals that make Cordyceps SO SPECIAL are destroyed by ALL conventional extraction methods. Alcohol extracts out the chemicals that are soluble in alcohol and water extracts the chemicals soluble in water. Some other molecules are destroyed, unfortunately, in the process. WITH FITT™, NOTHING IS DESTROYED.

Therefore, a FITT™ tincture will contain all the phytonutrients contained in the herb while it is still fresh from the mountain. That is why the technology is called Fingerprint Identical Transfer Technology™. The “fingerprint” refers to the unique chemical composition of the herb in question, in this case Cordyceps. FITT™ does NOT cook the herbs to extract them and therefore enzymes and other complex proteins are preserved. Even though this is an “extract,” its chemistry is essentially “raw.” It is a “raw extract.” I had it produced as a tincture because I think this requires the absolute least processing to get the full spectrum of constituents, and thus benefits.
I am confident that this is the finest extraction of raw Wild Cordyceps available anywhere in the world today.

Goodies For Download

Screensaver: Bhutanese Scenery. Click thumbnail to open image, then save to your computer.

Bhutanese Scene

Precautions and Notifications

Keep out of reach of children. Should you have a pre-existing medical condition, please consult your doctor before using these products. Pregnant women should exercise caution when taking herbal supplements. Please consult your doctors.

Additional Reading

Cordyceps has been used in traditionally as an elite general tonic for promoting longevity, vitality and endurance.

Cordyceps is used to strengthen the body and mind at a fundamental level. A Chinese herbal “classic” states that Cordyceps is able to “increase the primary motive force for life activities.”

Cordyceps is one of the few herbs in the world that tonifies both Yin and Yang. Because of its superb balance, and lack of side effects, it can be used by almost anyone safely and over a long period of time. It replenishes Yin Essence (Yin Jing), restoring the deep energy expended as a result of excessive exertion, adapting to stress, or from aging. Cordyceps is one of the primary herbal substances used in tonic herbalism as an antiaging agent and for the purposes of rejuvenation. It is especially good for those who are in a weakened condition or by those who desire to visibly increase vitality and performance. People in peak physical condition also benefit from Cordyceps, as it can make a noticeable difference in athletic performance, and some people say sexual performance.

As a tonic, Cordyceps is now being used by athletes around the world. It improves performance partly by improving oxygen consumption by the cardiopulmonary system under stress and increasing tissue “steady state” energy levels. Cordyceps also appears to modulate immune function and optimize endocrine system functions, increasing physical strength and endurance. Cordyceps’ has powerful, deep tonifying action. It is used to overcome weakness.

Wang Junxia

Pictured on the left: Wang Junxia, record breaking long-distance runner, consumed Cordyceps daily during training.

For three years in the mid-1990s Wang Junxia dominated the world of female distance running. She became the fastest long distance runner in the world, and in history. Wang broke the world records in the 3,000 and 10,000 meter runs, and won gold and silver medals at the Atlanta Olympics. As a key part of her training program, she consumed an herbal tonic in which Wild Cordyceps was the main ingredient. Though her performances caused many people to speculate that she had used steroids, Wang never failed a drug test though she was tested relentlessly during the entire period. She denies ever using a steroid or any performance enhancing substance other than the legal, safe, life enhancing tonic herbs, headed by Cordyceps.

Condition/Health Topic

A Powerful Yang Tonic

Cordyceps is used for the purposes of strengthening the primal Kidney functions, which include sexual functions, brain power, structural integrity (bones, joints and connective tissues) and healing ability. As a sexual tonic, Cordyceps is considered to be one of the best. It is not as quick acting as the major Yang tonics like Deer Antler, Epimedium, Cistanche and Sea Dragon, but it has a profound long term strengthening capacity, and of course, may be used along with other Yang tonics. Nevertheless, many people claim that Cordyceps is the most powerful aphrodisiac of them all! It is used by both men and women.

Consistent use of Cordyceps helps to strengthen the skeletal structure, and specifically benefits the lower back region, the knees and ankles. It is traditionally used for minor and temporary backache due to injury, fatigue, stress or aging.

Cordyceps is also a major Lung tonic. It can be used to strengthen respiratory power in those who require extra energy in order to perform physical work (e.g., sports, exercise or labor) or it can be used by those who experience a deficiency of Lung power.

Cordyceps has always been used as a primary herb to fortify the defensive system of the body, and recent data indicate that Cordyceps is a potent immune system potentiator. Researchers in Japan and China have isolated a number of polysaccharides in Cordyceps which strengthen the immune system. Maintaining the immune system is one of the mechanisms that can slow down aging and help prevent both degenerative and acquired diseases.

Other studies have shown that Cordyceps can have a benefit in the vascular system as well. Cordyceps improves the function of the micro-circulation and improves efficiency at the capillary level. This is very important to our longevity. Cordyceps has been shown to support healthy blood pressure and to strengthen heart muscle.

Cordyceps is very highly regarded in China as a tonic for those who are recovering from an illness or an operation, or after giving birth. In these cases, the Cordyceps helps the patient recover their physical power, improve their appetite, and help protect the body from infection. When blended with other tonics such as Ginseng, Ganoderma (Reishi mushroom), Schizandra, Lycium (Goji) or Astragalus, Cordyceps’ power is even increased as the synergy of the various herbs results in an even more powerful tonic.

Inner Power - Jing

Recipes

Drink recipe...Coming Soon!

*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Where Does It Come From?

Wild Cordyceps is a true curiosity of nature. It is a mushroom (fungus) attached to the “mummified” (transformed) remains of a caterpillar (Hepialus armoricanus, the Himalayan Bat Moth), upon which it has grown. Hepialus armoricanus and Cordyceps sinensis have evolved together over millions of years. The Latin name Cordyceps comes from the words cord, meaning "club," and ceps, meaning "head.” It is thus a “club fungus.” A whitish mycelium (main fungus body) grows around the caterpillar and invades it. By the time the mushroom is mature, there is little or nothing left of the actual caterpillar body. The outer mycelium is always peeled off in the field, revealing the caterpillar “mummy” which maintains the appearance of the caterpillar. The outer mycelium is discarded and is not used as part of the herb. This is a very strange looking “herb,” indeed. Since it has transformed from animal to mushroom, Cordyceps is generally considered to be a fungus, and is even considered to be vegetarian by most Himalayan Buddhists.

Wild Cordyceps is collected early each summer at the snow line of Himalayan peaks, primarily in Tibet, Bhutan, Nepal and China. The environment in which it grows is extremely harsh. Wild Himalayan Cordyceps is only found at altitudes above 11,500 feet above sea level, with the best Wild Cordyceps collected at higher altitudes up to 18,000 feet. There is little oxygen at this altitude and UV radiation is intense. Daily temperatures often fluctuate by 40 to 70 degrees F°. Even during the summer collection season, snow showers occur frequently and night frost is generally the rule. Only a few species of animals and certain very hardy plants have adapted to this environment over many millennia. Cordyceps normally exists only at altitudes between 3300m- 4800m and tends to grow where yaks graze.

The snow line is devoid of trees, and is a “grassy” zone of low lying alpine herbs and vegetation. It is usually quite rocky. Humans do not live at this altitude and even the hardy Himalayan natives find this environment challenging. Most foreigners who venture to the snowline experience altitude sickness. Those who are not accustomed to this altitude often find it daunting. Furthermore, since the environment can easily be damaged by clumsy clod-hopping behavior, non-natives are generally prohibited from trampling through most Cordyceps hunting areas in Tibet. Foreigners rarely make it to the Cordyceps collecting areas in Bhutan because it takes seven days on foot and by yak, horse or mule from the end of the last road to get there, and seven days back to the road.

Just prior to the summer rainy season, spores of cordyceps mushroom land on the Himalayan caterpillars that live on moist grass and hollow ground. Spread by the wind, the spores of the Cordyceps sinensis fungus come into contact with Bat Moth caterpillars, particularly when the caterpillars emerge to feed.

The caterpillars may eat the spores, or the spores can become stuck on their bodies. The caterpillar crawls back into the ground. If the spores germinate, they enter the caterpillars’ bodies through the mouth or the respiratory pores. The fungus first paralyzes the caterpillar, then the mycelium invades the caterpillar’s body, killing the caterpillar, filling its body cavity, and eventually completely replacing the host tissue. After being “infected” or “invaded” by the fungus, the caterpillar “mummy” remains in the soil, encased in a coat of white mycelium.

As temperature increases, the snow melts – and soon thereafter the Cordyceps emerges. The stroma (mushroom fruiting body) grows up from spring to early summer, emerging above ground, hidden among other low lying plants.

Cordyceps, the Caterpillar Fungus, emerges in April in Bhutan. But April picking can be very destructive to the Cordyceps sinensis population as the ascospores are not yet dispersed and this could lead to eventual loss of Cordyceps from the ecosystem. April picking is prohibited throughout the Himalayas, though poachers don’t follow any rules.

Most Cordyceps have one stroma, though an occasional Cordyceps may have two. The stroma protrudes and develops out of the caterpillar’s forehead and is typically 1 to 2 inches long. The club-shaped stroma is a dark, rusty brown color. Under a microscope one can see that the fresh stroma bears many small fruiting bodies that contain the asci, which are sacs where spores are formed. If left uncollected, the spores are distributed in the early summer.

Upon drying, the length of the caterpillar mummy varies roughly from 1 to 2 inches long and appears yellowish-brown in color, while the stroma varies from 1 to 2 inches long and turns almost black.

And thus, “winter worm” becomes “summer grass” – the transformation is complete. Harvest period is short because the monsoon rains come in July. During monsoon, the Cordyceps is swept away.

Cordyceps Collecting in Bhutan
The growing season generally runs from the beginning of May until the end of June. After that period, the caterpillar mummy, which is embedded in the ground, rots. The weather is the great determinant of the harvest. And of course, it can be very unpredictable. If there is a lot of rain, there can be flooding and the ground can become so wet that much of the cordyceps rots without being collected. It can also cause flooding of rivers that must be traversed on the trip to and from the collecting zones, making them very dangerous or impossible to cross, thus restricting the flow of collectors to the collecting regions.
Harvest Season
Weather permitting, the harvest can proceed for about a month or a month and a half each spring-summer. In Tibet, new paved roads have been built going up to the collecting zones and permanent campsites have been constructed, especially at the lower elevation sites. In Bhutan and Nepal, road construction has not had the same financial backing, and the regions are more rugged. There are no roads – just narrow, muddy trails winding through Himalayan passes, some featuring precipices with no railings and thousand foot drops. The collecting season is set by law in Bhutan, and runs for just one month through the month of June. This protects the collectors, the environment and the sustainability of the Cordyceps. Tibet has similar rules. As a result of these limitations on the collecting season, the amount of Cordyceps has remained stable.
Protecting Valuable Cordyceps
Because of the value of Bhutanese Cordyceps, there has been a problem that dates back decades with poachers crossing over from Tibet and picking Bhutanese Cordyceps. The Bhutanese government now puts soldiers along the border between Tibet and Bhutan during the spring and summer. The Bhutanese Minister of Agriculture told me that “poaching by the Tibetans is serious as they pick whatever comes their way with inappropriate tools. Early picking goes counter to our country’s principles of sustainability.” The spores must be released before harvesting can begin, otherwise the Cordyceps population could simply disappear. Since they are released by the end of May, June has been set as the month for collecting.
The Collectors
In Bhutan, the collectors travel and work in groups of from 10 to 30 people, both men and women. Most of them are farmers from relatively high altitude areas below the Cordyceps collecting zones. They have the lungs, cardiovascular systems, endurance and mentality (incredible patience, concentration and ability to be careful for many hours on end, for days on end) to collect wild Cordyceps. They may split up into small groups of two or three, or form lines of six to twelve people. Some will search on their own. The collectors lie almost flat on the ground, scanning the area in front of them. The search for the tiny cordyceps in this high altitude is a difficult task, requiring virtually Zen-like concentration and patience. The stroma of the fungus emerging above the soil are so small that they are virtually invisible except to the highly skilled collectors. The ground is covered with short plants, much of which is the same brownish color as the Cordyceps. Gatherers I have talked to claim that the Cordyceps wiggles, as though being blown in the wind, in a manner different from the plants around them, but scholars say this is not possible. The hunt is often complicated by rain or snowfall. It is always cold (generally slightly above freezing in the daytime). They keep their faces close to the ground, carefully scanning the area in front of them. If they do find one and pluck it from the ground, or if they do not locate any cordyceps, they proceed slowly on their hands and knees. Relying on experience and instinct, they stand up from time to time and move to a nearby area to continue their search. They are extremely careful to move extremely slowly so as not to step on any cordyceps. When the collecting is complete, it is barely noticeable that humans have been there.
Fragile Cordyceps
If the soil is moist and soft, the Bhutanese gatherers have the skill to simply pluck the Cordyceps from the ground with their fingers, without breaking it. They are meticulous and each Cordyceps is a joyful triumph. If the gatherer is less skillful or if the soil is hard, they may extract it from the soil with a small knife or stick. In Bhutan, fingers are the preferred tool (see the video), while in Tibet a small trowel is most commonly used. It is important not to damage the Cordyceps, because a broken Cordyceps is of less value on the market (though it may be no less valuable in the soup pot).
Dragon Herbs Cordyceps
Our Dragon Herbs Wild Cordyceps comes from Bhutan. First of all, collecting Cordyceps is a very special enterprise, and the Bhutanese gatherers obviously love it. Despite the trouble of getting to the growing areas, Bhutanese Cordyceps gatherers are happy to perform this work. Bhutanese people are generally very happy anyway, and Cordyceps collecting is a special event for them. They definitely seem to enjoy the teamwork and quality time that they spend together, since most of the year they work their own farms. It is also highly profitable. For most of the collectors, the money they earn spending a few days at the snow line, once or twice each season, provides them with more money than they can earn in an entire year from their farms. Bhutanese people, being very devout Buddhists, tend to be quite peaceful and understand contentment. The Cordyceps harvest provides them with enough money to live very contented lives. A typical gatherer might find ten Cordyceps a day, and some lucky or skilled gatherers may find as many as twenty or thirty or even forty. If weather is bad, however, finding just five in one day might be satisfying. Since whole families can go collecting, and even whole villages, following a royal command issued by the King of Bhutan in 2004, the cumulative profit can be substantial for the collectors.

Quote Cordyceps

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